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A-levels, study strategies

How To Study For Tests: Earn An A* On Your EOU Tests


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Learning how to study for tests is a key skill that all students need to know if they are going to be successful in their A-level courses. In A-levels, end of unit (EOU) tests are used by a teacher to assess how much the students know about a given topic in the course. They are administered and marked by the teacher every three to four weeks. If the student does well on the test they are praised for working hard and meeting or exceeding their predicted grade. If they don’t do so well on the test the teacher may suggest attending subject tutorial once a week or place them on an academic contract.

As a parent, how is your child doing on their EOU tests? Are they passing their EOU tests with their predicted grade or higher? Do they feel confident when studying for and taking their EOU tests? Or, are they failing their EOU tests? Do they feel as if studying for the tests is a waste of time because they don’t know what concepts will be on the tests?

If you are interested in helping your child earn their predicted grade or higher on their EOU tests then keep on reading!

Tip #1: Preparation: Notes And Homework Sets

how to study for tests

The first step your child needs to take when learning how to study for tests is to be prepared for their EOU tests. Being prepared for their EOU tests means that they are organised, have a master set of notes and understand the homework sets for the module.

They need to be organised which was a concept was discussed in detail in the blog post Six Form Essentials: How To Help Your Child Get Organised For Their A-Levels. In brief, they need to have an A4 lever arch folder, college ruled paper, plastic sheet protectors, tabbed dividers, coloured pens and pencils, a calculator and a school planner.

They need to have a master set of notes for the unit. Creating a master set of notes was a concept that was discussed in detail in the blog post How To Take Notes At A-Level To Earn An A*. In brief, they need to have a detailed set of notes based on the specification for the unit which allows them to complete homework sets and past paper questions to a high level of accuracy without referring to their textbook.

And they also need to understand their homework sets for the unit. Scheduling time to complete their homework set which was discussed in detail in the blog post A-Level Success Tips: How To Manage Your Workload. In brief, they need to understand their homework set for the unit. This means that they understand and explain the concept being tested in each question on the homework set.

If they aren’t prepared for their EOU test now is not the time for your child to start with day one of the course and try to get caught up with their organization, notes and homework sets. Rather, they should focus on completing a master set of notes and understand the homework set for the unit. If they don’t understand their homework set it is imperative that they see their subject tutor as quickly as possible to learn the concepts being tested on their homework set.

How To Study For Tests: Tip #2: Revise By Question Type

how to study for tests

The second step your child needs to take when learning how to study for tests involves having a strategy for completing past paper questions. Most students complete packs of past paper questions by answering the questions in sequential order. They then make a note of what questions they answered incorrectly when marking their work and repeat the process. The issue with this method is that they are not practising a template for a model answer and practising what they understand rather they are reinforcing the incorrect way of answering a question until they complete a pack of questions and mark their work.

A better approach is for your child to complete the questions strategically by answering the questions in order of decreasing point value. Your child answers all of the six-marker questions in the question pack and repeats the process for the five-marker questions and work their way through the pack answering sequentially lower point value questions until they had answered all of the questions in the pack.

If they run out of time they change pen colours and keep working until they have answered all of the questions in the pack. They then mark their work using the mark scheme and update their notes to include any keywords or definitions, concepts or strategies for answering questions.

The reason that this approach is so effective is that allows the student to model correct answers for each of the types of questions. It also allows the student to get into the habit of answering the large point questions first on the exam. And it allows them to become more relaxed on the exam by quickly earning their predicted grade on the exam.

Tip #3: Use The Mark Scheme To Guide Your Revision

The third step your child needs to take is to use the mark scheme to guide their revision for the EOU test. Too often, students complete packs of past paper questions with the mark scheme open which gives them a false sense of security about the content on the test. They believe that they know the course content when actually they don’t know the course content. Or they don’t understand how to use the mark schemes effectively in their revision.

The use of mark schemes in a student’s revision for the tests has been discussed in detail in the blog post A-Level Mark Schemes: 5 Ways They Can Be Used To Earn An A*.

When using a mark scheme to mark their work your child should complete the following three tasks:

  • Check the mark scheme for keywords or phrases which are printed in bold and are commonly known as Quality Of Language (QOL) and update their notes to include these terms.
  • Check the point value for question in the mark scheme and make sure that their answer contains enough concepts, i.e. one concept per point to earn all of the points that the question is worth.
  • Check that they have the concept in the answer in the mark scheme in their notes. This will allow them to maximise the value that they get from using mark schemes in their revision plan.

If they follow these steps your child will see a rapid increase in the grades that they earn on their EOU tests. This is because they will be engaging with the mark scheme in what is known as active learning rather than just reading the mark scheme in what is known as passive learning.

Tip #4: Think Like A Teacher

how to study for tests

The fourth step that your child needs to take when learning how to study for tests is to think like a teacher when they are studying for their EOU tests. Students often wonder what is on their EOU tests and how they should best revise for their tests. Sometimes they are surprised to see a concept on the test and wonder if they have been taught the concept in their lessons.

Thinking like a teacher allows a student to bridge the gap between the course specification, their notes, their homework set and their EOU test. Students need to keep in mind that the test is timed and so there can only be so many questions on the test. With this in mind, their teacher has to choose the questions carefully when making the test to make sure the test is levelled for the average student in the class and covers all of the major topics covered in the unit.

When revising for their test, your child should keep the following three points in mind when reviewing questions.

First, they should check to see if the question is checking their understanding of a major topic that is listed in the course specification for the unit. If it is then it’s a type of question that is most likely going to be on the test. Also, if the question keeps appearing in the pack of past paper questions they are completing where maybe small changes have been made to the question then this is another strong indication that this type of question will be on the test.

Second, is the question a synoptic question? A synoptic question is a question which includes two concepts in the question and requires an understanding of each of the concepts and the relationship between the concepts in order to answer the question. It is a favourite type of question for teachers to use on exams because it allows them to test the student’s understanding of two related concepts without using too many points on the test.

Third, is the question a challenging question? When a teacher makes a test they have to be able to differentiate between the A* and the A students. To do this they normally include one question on the test that requires a higher level of mathematics ability or a deeper understanding of a complex concept. When revising for an EOU test look for questions that fit these criteria and make sure that you understand them as they will probably be on the test.

If your child follows these three simple rules when studying for their EOU test they will see a marked improvement in their test scores because they will be thinking like a teacher.

Tip #5: Complete Past Paper Questions Under Timed Conditions

The fifth step your child needs to take when learning how to study for tests is to complete past paper questions under timed conditions. A lot of students complete past paper questions under non-exam conditions when revising for their EOU tests. They complete past paper questions without keeping an eye on the time with the thought that they are better off learning the material and that they will complete some past paper questions under timed conditions at a future date. The issue with this idea is that most students don’t tend to complete past paper questions under timed conditions because they run out of time studying for their EOU tests.

A better idea is to always complete past paper questions under timed conditions. If your child runs out of time completing the pack of past paper questions they should change pen colours and keep on working until they have completed the pack of past paper questions. After they have marked them and updated their master set of notes they need to complete the next pack of past paper questions more quickly while maintaining a high level of accuracy.

The idea is to be able to complete a pack of past paper questions in 90% of the allotted time. So, if they have 60 minutes of past paper questions your child should be able to complete the pack of past paper questions in 54 minutes. If they practice answering past paper questions in 90% of the allotted time on the EOU test they will have a few minutes to spare at the end of the test to check their work. And they will not feel as if they are working under time pressure on the test.

How To Study For Tests: 5 Strategies To Earn An A*

In order to earn their predicted grades on higher on their EOU tests your child needs to complete the following:

  • Be organised and have a set of master notes for the module.
  • Study by question type.
  • Use the mark scheme to guide their revision.
  • Think like a teacher
  • Complete past papers under timed conditions.

If they complete these five steps discussed in this blog post your child will earn the highest grade that they can on their EOU tests.

study strategies

5 Revision Tips For A-Levels: How To Increase Your Course Grade


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Revision tips for A-levels is a subject that most parents are interested in learning about. They are watching their child transition from being a GCSE student to being an A-level student. Their children have managed to organise their day effectively and are using a note-taking system to capture the ideas that they are learning in class. And they are managing their workload so they don’t get burnt out with their studies.

The next step in their journey is to learn how to revise effectively so they can earn their predicted grade on their EOU tests. So, if you are interested in learning how your child can study effectively for their EOU tests and want to learn about the five revision tips for A-levels then keep on reading!

Why Earning Your Predicted Grade On EOU Tests Is Really Important

revision tips for a-levels

When talking to your child about how their A-levels are going they may mention that they have just received their test papers back from their teacher. They may have earned a good grade on their exam and be happy with their results or they may have earned a bad grade on their exam and be frustrated with the teacher and their progress in the course. In either situation, as a parent, it is important that you keep track of their grades in the course.

There are three reasons that this is an important task for you to complete as you help your child be successful with their A-levels. The first is that the teacher uses their course grade to monitor your child’s progress against the predicted grade they have been assigned in the course. The predicted grade is the grade that the college believes that they should be able to attain based on their GCSE grades. If their course grade is below their predicted grade then their teacher has to follow the college policy and place them on an academic contract. This may involve taking away their free periods so they can attend mandatory study sessions, require that they attend mandatory subject tutorials and be set improvement goals on their exam grades that they must attain otherwise further action will be taken.

The second is that the course grade is a good indication of how your child is learning and retaining the information in the course. If your child’s course grade is above or equal to their predicted grade then you have nothing to worry about. If it’s one letter grade below the predicted grade then its something to be concerned about. If its two or more letter grades below the predicted grade then its something that requires immediate action on your part. The reason for this is that the longer your child is not working at their predicted grade in the course the more difficult it is for them to get their grades back on track.

The third is that your child’s course grade is a strong indicator of what grade they will earn on their UCAS prediction exam. The UCAS prediction exam is the exam your child takes at the end of Year 12 which along with their course grades is used to predict the grades that they will earn at the end of the course. And this is used by universities to give unconditional and conditional offers to prospective students.

Help your child understand the importance of their course grades:

  • Talk to them about the grades they are earning on their EOU tests.
  • Help them understand the importance of keeping their course grades on track with their predicted grade.
  • Help them understand that their course grades and their UCAS grades are used to predict their final grades in the course.

Once your child understands the importance of earning their predicted grade on their EOU tests then they will understand the importance of the 5 revision tips for a-levels and how it can help them earn good grades in their courses.

Revision Tips For A-Levels: Create A Master Set Of Notes Using The Course Specification

revision tips for a-levels

The first tip you can use to help your child is to help them create a master set of notes using the course specification as a guide. If you need help doing this then read the blog post “How To Take Notes At A-Level To Earn An A*“. It is crucial that your child has a master set of notes before they start revising for their EOU tests.

The idea is that your child takes notes during the lesson that captures the concepts being taught in the lesson using a note-taking system. Then they create a master set of notes from the notes that they took during the lesson, from reading the resources they were given in the lesson and from reading the textbook. As they create their master set of notes they are using the course specification as a guide making sure that they have notes on topic and subtopic listed in the course specification.

The indicator that your child has a thorough set of master notes is when they can follow the directions of each subtopic listed in the course specification for the topic. For example, they can state the definition if a key term. They can describe the trend seen in a set of data. Or they can compute for an unknown variable using the formula given in the textbook.

Help your child create a master set of notes for each of the units in their course:

  • Review with them how to create a master set of notes using the link above.
  • Help them create a master set of notes for each topic.
  • Use the course specification as a guide to quiz your child on the course material contained in their master set of notes.

Revision Tips For A-Levels: Make Sure They Understand Their Homework

The second tip you can use to help your child is to make sure they understand their homework sets. There is a distinct difference between completing a homework set and understanding a homework set. When your child is given a homework set there is a due date associated with the homework set. Your child completes their homework set by the due date and submits it to their teacher. When they get their graded homework set back from their teacher they make a note of the grade that they earned on the assignment and file it in their folder.

When a child understands a homework set they understand they take their learning one step further than other students. They make sure they understand the questions being asked on the homework set and seek clarification of any concepts they don’t understand before they complete the homework set and submit it. When they get the homework back from the teacher they review their homework set using a mark scheme, make a note of what questions they got correct, seek clarification on what questions they got wrong and update their master set of notes. They then file the homework set in the appropriate section of their lever arch folder.

If your child is are having issues completing their homework by the due date then make sure you read the blog post “A-Level Success Tips: How To Manage Your Workload” so that you can help them complete their homework in a timely manner.

It’s taking the time to review their graded homework set and fill in any gaps in their knowledge that is the important point. If your child does this as they complete their homework then they will keep up with the course work and their understanding of the course work.

Help your child understand their homework sets:

  • Review with them the blog post on how to manage their workload.
  • Make sure they are submitting completed homework sets by the due date.
  • Discuss with them the importance of understanding their homework sets rather than completing their homework sets.
  • Encourage them to see their tutor during subject tutorial and ask for clarification on any concept in the homework that they don’t understand.

Revision Tips For A-Levels: Use Past Papers Wisely

revision tips for a-levels

The third tip that you can use to help your child is to help them use past papers wisely in their revision for their EOU tests. When a student knows that they have an EOU test coming up the tendency is to print off packs of past paper questions on the unit that have been made available by the college or that they can download from the internet. They complete the past paper questions with the mark scheme open. They read the question, think about what they would write on the exam, check the mark scheme and write down the answer in the mark scheme. To the student, this makes perfect sense since they are saving time by not writing down the incorrect answer, having to mark their work and then correct their work.

The are several issues with this strategy. The student is lulled into a false sense of security. They will not have the mark scheme available to them on during their test so they will feel additional stress on exam day. They are not practising how to recall information from their short term and long-term memory so they will not be able to do this during their exam. They are not crystallising the thoughts in their head by writing down the answers on their practice papers. They are not learning how to answer exam questions in the style wanted by the examiner. They are not learning how to write answers worth the number of points for each question. And they are not learning how to answer each type of question that they will see on the exam.

A better way of studying for their end of unit tests is for your child to use the mark schemes in a more proactive manner in their revision. For a more detailed explanation of this approach read the blog post “A-Level Mark Schemes: 5 Ways They Can Be Used To Get An A*“. The idea is that your child prints off a pack of past paper questions and completes them under timed conditions with the mark scheme closed. Once they have completed as many questions as they can under the time given they mark their work against the mark scheme making a note of what questions they got incorrect and on what questions they lost points. If they don’t understand a concept they ask their teacher for clarification the next day they are in school. They then update their notes and add to their notes anything that is missing that prevented them from getting the question correct on the exam. After they have completed this cycle for one pack of past paper questions they complete the cycle on subsequent packs of past paper questions. Using this method builds your child’s confidence their exam-taking ability, allows them to practice the recall of information from their short term and long term memory, allows them to practice writing answers to exam questions in the way that the examiner is looking for and allows them to practice answering certain types of questions.

Help your child use mark schemes effectively in their revision:

  • Review with them the blog post that discusses how to use mark schemes in their revision for their EOU tests.
  • Help your child understand that using mark schemes incorrectly is not going to help them earn a good grade on the final exam.
  • Help your child understand that using mark schemes correctly allows them to develop their exam-taking skills and helps consolidate their knowledge in the course.

Revision Tips For A-Levels: Learn To Think Like A Teacher

The fourth tip you can use to help your child is to help them think like a teacher. When putting a test together the teacher can only include so many questions due to the time constraint of the test. Therefore teachers tend to create their tests using four criteria: Does the question test one of the main concepts from the course specification for a unit? Has the content of the question been included in the test in a different question? Does the question include a different question type that has not already been included in the test? Is the question one that is more challenging and can be used to differentiate between A* and A students?

With this understanding of how their teacher constructs a test, your child can now approach their revision with a more critical eye. They can start to think like their teacher when they are completing past paper questions. When they are completing a question they can ask themselves questions such as:

  • What main concept listed in the course specification is this question testing?
  • Have I seen a different question that tests this concept? If so, is this a better question compared to the other one? Which one would I include on the exam?
  • What type of question is this (definition, concept, computational, mechanism, six-marker)?
  • Does this question contain parts that could be used to differentiate between A* and A students?

By pausing to reflect on each question type your child is analyzing the question from the holistic or big-picture perspective and cataloguing questions into different types. This allows them to analyse the question based on the concept being tested, the type of question, the point value of the question and difficulty of the question. This is a much more effective way of studying compared to completing stacks of past paper questions.

If you need help with helping your child study effectively for their exams then read the blog post “A-Level Chemistry Revision: 5 Study Skills Used By A* Students” for more information.

Help your child think like a teacher when revising for their tests:

  • Help them analyse the test questions using the four criteria listed in this section.
  • Help them catalogue questions into different question types.
  • Help them analyse each question and determine if it should be included in an EOU test.

Complete PPQ under exam conditions

The fifth tip that you can use to help your child is to help them complete past paper questions under timed conditions. A lot of students run out of time on their exams which causes them to earn a lower grade on the exam. This can be overcome by helping your child complete past paper questions under exam conditions as part of their revision cycle.

This step is the last part of their revision cycle and to be beneficial must be completed after they have completed their master set of notes, understood all of the concepts on their homework sets, have completed packs of past paper questions and analysed practice questions. Otherwise, it will have little benefit to your child.

To complete past paper questions under timed conditions your child completes as many of the past paper questions in the time allotted. For example, if the pack of past paper questions had a time limit of 60 minutes then they spend 60 minutes completing the papers with the mark scheme closed. If they run out of time they change the colour of the pen that they are using and complete the rest of the questions in the pack.

Next, they mark the papers using the mark scheme using the strategy outlined in this blog post. Then they determine why they ran out of time completing the pack of past paper questions. Was it because they didn’t know the concept? Was it because they could not recall the concept? Did they spend too much time determining what the question was asking them? Did they spend too long answering the question? Did they become mentally fatigued as they were completing the questions?

The answer to all of these questions indicates a specific weakness in your child’s study habits that can be fixed by adapting their study habits. After they have determined how they will strengthen the weaknesses in their study habits they consolidate their learning by re-reading and adding to their notes and seeking help from their teacher. Then they complete another set of past paper questions with the target goal of completing the questions 10% faster than they did previously while maintaining their predicted grade on the past paper questions.

The final goal with regards to completing past paper questions under timed conditions is to be able to complete the questions in 90% of the allotted time. This gives your child 10% of the allotted time on the exam to review their work for errors and check that they have answered all of the questions correctly before submitting the exam to their teacher.

Help your child complete past paper questions under timed conditions:

  • Have them complete as many of the past paper questions they can in the allotted time.
  • Have them complete any remaining questions using a different colour pen.
  • Have them determine why they didn’t complete all of the past paper questions in the allotted time.
  • Help them update their revision plan to strengthen any weaknesses in their plan.
  • Help them set a goal to complete the past paper questions in 90% of the time allotted while maintaining their predicted grade.

If you help your child use the five revision tips for a-levels mentioned in this blog post they will be well on their way to earning their predicted grade or higher on their EOU tests. This is because the five revision tips for a-levels discussed in this blog post help your child think about their course work holistically and begin to think like a teacher. This gives them a competitive edge that allows them to increase their grade in the course.

A-levels, time management

A-Level Success Tips: How To Manage Your Workload


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As a parent do you wish that there were meaningful A-level success tips that you could pass on to your child? Like many parents, you may notice that the transition from GCSEs to A-levels can be a challenging time for your child due to a number of reasons. They may have to travel to a sixth form college on their own and navigate the local public transportation system during the morning rush hour. They have a get used to a schedule where they are not micromanaged by their teachers like they were in their GCSE courses. And they have to adapt to a new learning environment where the teacher teaches the concepts in a discussion-based format and they consolidate their learning by completing packs of past paper questions as part of their homework set.

A lot of students struggle to transition to A-levels from their GCSEs during the first term of their A-level courses. The primary reason for this is that they don’t know how to handle the workload associated with being an A-level student. They are expected to learn how to handle the workload as they are learning how to navigate the local public transportation system, learning how to manage their time, learning how to study effectively and learning the course material!

As a parent, you realise that there is a lot of pressure on your child to be successful in their A-levels. After all, their place on their university course depends on the grades that they get on their A-level exams. Learning how to manage their workload is something that all sixth form students need to master if they are going to be successful in their A-levels.

This blog post contains five A-level success tips to help your child manage their workload. If you want to help them learn how to manage A-levels and how to manage their workload then keep on reading!

A-Level Success Tips: Is Your Child In A Reactive or Proactive State?

A-level success tips

When discussing how to handle their workload with your child the first step you need to take is to determine whether your child is in a reactive or a proactive state. If your child is in a reactive state then they will be experiencing negative stress which is unhealthy for them. They will feel overwhelmed with the amount of work they have to accomplish in their A-level courses. They will feel that they don’t have enough time to complete their homework sets. And they will feel that they don’t have time to prepare for their EOU tests.

If your child is in a proactive state then they will be feeling positive stress which is healthy for them. They will still have the same deadlines as the child who is in a reactive state but they will feel as if they can handle the workload of the A-level courses. They will feel that although they are working hard at their studies that they have enough time to complete their homework sets. And although it’s normal to feel nervous about taking exams they will feel that they are prepared for their EOU tests.

As a parent, in order to complete the first step, you need to determine whether your child is in the reactive or proactive state and explain to them that it is possible to move from the reactive to the proactive state. This can be accomplished by planning out their time more effectively.

Help your child manage their workload by completing this A-level success tip:

  • Explaining to them the difference between a reactive and proactive state.
  • Explain the difference between negative stress (unhealthy) and positive stress (healthy).
  • Determine whether they are in a reactive or a proactive state.

Long Term Planning

A-level success tips

The second step you need to take with your child is to help them plan their time more effectively. This can be accomplished by helping them with their long term planning. To start with they will need a paper planner or a calendar which they can purchase either online or from their local stationery store. Or they can print one off from the internet.

It doesn’t matter what type of planner they have or where they obtain the planner as long as they have the ability to plan three or four months into the future. The reason why they need to plan three or four months into the future is that this is the typical length of a term. School terms normally last between 12 weeks (3 months) or 16 weeks (4 months).

The first task that they are going to accomplish is to write down all of the events that they know are going to occur during the term. For example, they would record vacation days and the beginning and end of the half-term vacation. And they would record any days of school that they are missing due to school-sanctioned events. These may include medicine academy events, engineering field trips or university open days.

A quick win at this point in order to foster a positive relationship with your child’s tutor is to let them know in advance when they are planning on being absent from school. This can easily be achieved by making a note on the planner on the seventh day prior to the event happening that your child will email their tutor and let them know that they plan on being absent on that day. Teachers also plan their school term and they really appreciate knowing in advance if a student is planning on being absent so they can move EOU tests or practicals.

Help your child manage their workload:

  • Help them obtain a planner either from the internet or their local stationery store.
  • Help them record any vacation days and the start and end of the half-term vacation.
  • Help them write in their planner the dates of any events that they plan on attending during the term.
  • Help them make a note on their planner to email their teacher seven days in advance to let them know in advance of their absence from class.

Medium Term Planning

A-level success tips

The third step you need to take with your child is the medium-term planning. This involves planning out each month of the three or four-month long term plan in as much detail as possible. Have your child ask their teacher when the due dates are for the assessments in their course. This includes items such as EOU tests, practicals, quizzes and homework sets. Most teachers plan either a half-term or a term in advance so they will probably be able to tell your child when these events are occurring each month.

If they can’t tell your child the exact dates these events are occurring then have your child ask them the frequency at which they are occurring each month. For example, they may tell your child that since the class is covering a topic once every three weeks then they can expect an EOU test once every four weeks. Or that the practicals occur once every three weeks.

The idea is that your child obtains as much information as possible about the assessments occurring in their courses and writes these dates into their planners. This way they are not worried when the teacher announces these events. Rather they were expecting them to occur and they had planned ahead in their planners to be ready for these events.

Help your child manage their workload:

  • Have them ask their teacher for the due dates of any recurring events such as EOU tests, practicals, quizzes and homework sets.
  • Have your child write these events into their planner for each month of the term.

A-Level Success Tips: The Three Day Rule

A-level success tips

The fourth step you need to take with your child is to help them implement the three-day rule. The three-day rule is what allows your child to transition from the reactive state to the proactive state. Although this is a simple rule to follow it is one of the important steps out of the five steps mentioned in this blog post. It is one of the A-level success tips that you definitely want to explain to your child.

Let’s assume that your child is given homework by their teacher which is due on Friday. Your child would immediately write the due date of their assignment into their planner. They then count back three days from the due date and make a note that they will start their homework set on Tuesday.

As soon as they receive the homework from their teacher they read through the questions on the homework and make sure that they understand the questions. They also make sure that they understand the concept being tested in the homework. If they are unclear about anything in the homework they ask their teacher for clarification and help to understand the concept before they leave college for the day.

On Tuesday (3 days out) they complete their master set of notes for the topic. To help your child create a master set of notes read the blog post How To Take Notes At A-Level To Earn An A*. On Wednesday (2 days out) they complete their homework assignment. On Thursday (1 day out) they review their homework assignment to make sure that they have answered all of the questions correctly, place it into their day folder and put the folder into their book bag.

By implementing this rule your child is not working into the early hours of the morning the day before the assignment is due. They are not feeling as if they don’t have enough time to complete the assignment and understand the concepts on the homework set. They are not feeling negative stress! Rather they are completing each step of the three-day plan in a timely manner each day.

The three-day rule is a suggested amount of time that your child should be spending on their assignments. It is a flexible rule and can be adapted as your child works through their course work. For example, if they find that they need four days in order to complete their A-level chemistry homework the next time they are given homework in their A-level chemistry class they budget four days to complete the homework set rather than three days. And they update their planner accordingly.

Help your child manage their workload:

  • Help them understand the three-day rule.
  • Help them understand that the three-day rule is flexible.

Short Term Planning

The fifth step you need to take with your child is short term planning. This involves implementing the three-day rule in all of their courses and for all of their assignments. If they implement the three-day rule for all of their courses they will have a detailed plan for what they need to accomplish each day. Each of the A-level success tips mentioned in this blog post is important in their own right but your child needs to especially implement this one in order to be successful.

If they know about the assignment from their long term and medium-term planning they can easily implement the three-day rule for each assignment by counting backwards from the due date three days and completing their notes on day one, the assignment on day two and checking their work on day three.

If they don’t know the due date of the assignment from long term and medium-term planning but rather are given the assignment in class then the rule still applies. As soon as they are given the assignment they make a note of the due date in their planner and count back three days to start the process of the three-day rule.

Since they have completed this process for all of their coursework they will have populated each day of their planner with specific tasks that they need to complete for each of their courses. For example, they may have to read a given number of pages of their textbook for their A-level history class, complete a past paper for their A-level physics class and revise for an upcoming EOU test for their A-level chemistry class. To help your child create a revision plan for their EOU exams read the blog post A-Level Chemistry Revision: 5 Study Skills Used By A* Students.

Help your child manage their workload:

  • Help them implement the three-day rule for all of the assignments in all of their courses and write down what they need to complete each day in their planner.
  • Help them stick to the plan and complete each of the tasks they need to complete each day on their planner.

What Happens If Your Child Is Overwhelmed With Work?

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If your child is in a reactive state and is overwhelmed with work you can help them transition to a proactive state. You need to talk to your child and explain that it is possible to move to a proactive state in two easy steps. First, they need to put in some extra work and effort in order to get caught up with their course work. Second, they need to spend about an hour and complete their planning for the course and implement the three-day rule.

Hopefully, you have found the A-level success tips mentioned in this blog post to be beneficial and will explain them to your child. The workload at A-levels can be daunting for your child as they transition from GCSE to A-level. However, with careful planning of their time and sticking to a schedule they can have a successful A-level experience.